International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism Int J Endocrinol Metab http://www.endometabol.com 1726-913X 1726-9148 10.5812/ijem en jalali 2017 6 28 gregorian 2017 6 28 12 4
en 10.5812/ijem.15806 Invasive Thyroid Angiosarcoma With a Favorable Outcome Invasive Thyroid Angiosarcoma With a Favorable Outcome case-report case-report Conclusions

We described a rare case of a usually aggressive thyroid angiosarcoma in a patient living in a non-Alpine region, with an unusual favorable outcome after the operation and radiotherapy.

Case Presentation

An asymptomatic 61-year-old woman presented with a right lobe thyroid nodule with fine needle aspiration cytology indicating “suspicious for malignancy” was reported in our study. Histological examination revealed a vascular 35mm neoplasm with areas of necrosis. Immunohistochemistry staining had negative results for MNF, CAM5.2, CD34, thyroglobulin, and positive for CD31. The findings described were compatible with angiosarcoma diagnosis. Besides, a 4mm papillary microcarcinoma was found in the left lobe. Computerized tomography (CT) scan performed about two months after the operation, showed a right neck nodular lesion, conditioning tracheal deviation. At our institution, the study performed was consistent with local recurrence (angiosarcoma). Tumor excision was performed and invasion to larynx, trachea and esophagus was detected intraoperatively. Histopathologic examination confirmed tumor recurrence and the patient was submitted to radiotherapy (60 Gy), completed four years ago. There is not, so far, any evidence of tumor recurrence.

Introduction

Thyroid angiosarcoma is a malignant neoplasm, which usually shows local aggressive behavior and associated with a high recurrence rate. It was originally described in the Alpine region and extremely rare in other parts of the world.

Conclusions

We described a rare case of a usually aggressive thyroid angiosarcoma in a patient living in a non-Alpine region, with an unusual favorable outcome after the operation and radiotherapy.

Case Presentation

An asymptomatic 61-year-old woman presented with a right lobe thyroid nodule with fine needle aspiration cytology indicating “suspicious for malignancy” was reported in our study. Histological examination revealed a vascular 35mm neoplasm with areas of necrosis. Immunohistochemistry staining had negative results for MNF, CAM5.2, CD34, thyroglobulin, and positive for CD31. The findings described were compatible with angiosarcoma diagnosis. Besides, a 4mm papillary microcarcinoma was found in the left lobe. Computerized tomography (CT) scan performed about two months after the operation, showed a right neck nodular lesion, conditioning tracheal deviation. At our institution, the study performed was consistent with local recurrence (angiosarcoma). Tumor excision was performed and invasion to larynx, trachea and esophagus was detected intraoperatively. Histopathologic examination confirmed tumor recurrence and the patient was submitted to radiotherapy (60 Gy), completed four years ago. There is not, so far, any evidence of tumor recurrence.

Introduction

Thyroid angiosarcoma is a malignant neoplasm, which usually shows local aggressive behavior and associated with a high recurrence rate. It was originally described in the Alpine region and extremely rare in other parts of the world.

Angiosarcoma;Thyroid;Neoplasia Angiosarcoma;Thyroid;Neoplasia http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=15806 Joana Couto Joana Couto Endocrinology Department, Portuguese Institute of Oncology FG, Porto, Portugal; Endocrinology Department, Portuguese Institute of Oncology FG, Porto, Portugal. Tel: + 351-969014901, Fax: + 351-225084001 Endocrinology Department, Portuguese Institute of Oncology FG, Porto, Portugal; Endocrinology Department, Portuguese Institute of Oncology FG, Porto, Portugal. Tel: + 351-969014901, Fax: + 351-225084001 Raquel G Martins Raquel G Martins Endocrinology Department, Portuguese Institute of Oncology FG, Porto, Portugal Endocrinology Department, Portuguese Institute of Oncology FG, Porto, Portugal Ana Paula Santos Ana Paula Santos Endocrinology Department, Portuguese Institute of Oncology FG, Porto, Portugal Endocrinology Department, Portuguese Institute of Oncology FG, Porto, Portugal Joana Matos Joana Matos Pathology Department, Portuguese Institute of Oncology FG, Porto, Portugal Pathology Department, Portuguese Institute of Oncology FG, Porto, Portugal Isabel Torres Isabel Torres Endocrinology Department, Portuguese Institute of Oncology FG, Porto, Portugal Endocrinology Department, Portuguese Institute of Oncology FG, Porto, Portugal
en 10.5812/ijem.16120 Desmopressin Lyophilisate for the Treatment of Central Diabetes Insipidus: First Experience in Very Young Infants Desmopressin Lyophilisate for the Treatment of Central Diabetes Insipidus: First Experience in Very Young Infants case-report case-report Introduction

In neonates and small infants, early diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and treatment with desmopressin in low doses (avoiding severe hypo- or hypernatremia) are important to prevent associated high morbidity and mortality in this particular age group.

Case Presentetion

We described pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic results of the use of recently launched oral desmopressin lyophilisate (Minirin Melt®) in two infants with CDI, diagnosed at the age of 12 and 62 days, respectively. We observed that a starting dose of 60 μg of Minirin Melt® in the first case resulted in a pharmacokinetic profile largely exceeding the reference frame observed in children with nocturnal enuresis, while a dose of 15 μg in the second case resulted in acceptable concentrations. After initial dose adjustments, administration of sublingual lyophilisate resulted in rather stable serum sodium concentrations.

Conclusions

Using Minirin Melt® in infants with CDI appears to be effective, easy to use and well tolerated.

Introduction

In neonates and small infants, early diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and treatment with desmopressin in low doses (avoiding severe hypo- or hypernatremia) are important to prevent associated high morbidity and mortality in this particular age group.

Case Presentetion

We described pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic results of the use of recently launched oral desmopressin lyophilisate (Minirin Melt®) in two infants with CDI, diagnosed at the age of 12 and 62 days, respectively. We observed that a starting dose of 60 μg of Minirin Melt® in the first case resulted in a pharmacokinetic profile largely exceeding the reference frame observed in children with nocturnal enuresis, while a dose of 15 μg in the second case resulted in acceptable concentrations. After initial dose adjustments, administration of sublingual lyophilisate resulted in rather stable serum sodium concentrations.

Conclusions

Using Minirin Melt® in infants with CDI appears to be effective, easy to use and well tolerated.

Desmopressin;Diabetes Insipidus;Infant;Hypernatremia Desmopressin;Diabetes Insipidus;Infant;Hypernatremia http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=16120 Kathleen De Waele Kathleen De Waele Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Martine Cools Martine Cools Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Ann De Guchtenaere Ann De Guchtenaere Department of Pediatric Nephrology , University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Department of Pediatric Nephrology , University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Johan Van de Walle Johan Van de Walle Department of Pediatric Nephrology , University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Department of Pediatric Nephrology , University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Ann Raes Ann Raes Department of Pediatric Nephrology , University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Department of Pediatric Nephrology , University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Sara Van Aken Sara Van Aken Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Kris De Coen Kris De Coen Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Piet Vanhaesebrouck Piet Vanhaesebrouck Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium Jean De Schepper Jean De Schepper Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium; Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, Belgium; Department of Pediatrics, Division of Paediatric Endocrinology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium. Tel: +32-93322760, Fax: +32-93323875 Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium; Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, Belgium; Department of Pediatrics, Division of Paediatric Endocrinology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium. Tel: +32-93322760, Fax: +32-93323875
en 10.5812/ijem.16429 Impact of Plasma Glucose Level at the Time of Fluorodeoxyglucose Administration on the Accuracy of FDG-PET/CT in the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Lesions Impact of Plasma Glucose Level at the Time of Fluorodeoxyglucose Administration on the Accuracy of FDG-PET/CT in the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Lesions research-article research-article Results

Thirty-four patients were hyperglycemic and 127 non diabetic. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of FDG-PET/CT were 90%, 88%, 87% and 91% in non diabetic and 82%, 92%, 95% and 73% in hyperglycemic patients, respectively. Overall, the accuracy was higher in non diabetic than hyperglycemic patients (89% vs. 85%).

Conclusions

Accuracy of FDG-PET/CT for primary diagnosis of pancreatic lesions is higher in patients with FPG levels < 126 mg/dL than in patients with FPG levels between 126 and 200 mg/dL.

Patients and Methods

In this retrospective study, 161 patients who had FDG-PET/CT for initial diagnosis of pancreatic lesions were included. Fasting plasma glucose levels before FDG administration were recorded. Accuracy of FDG-PET/CT in diagnosis of pancreatic lesions was compared between patients who were non diabetic (FPG < 126 mg/dL) and hyperglycemic (126 ≤ FPG < 200 mg/dL).

Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of FPG levels of < 200 mg/dL on the accuracy of FDG-PET/CT in diagnosis of pancreatic lesions.

Background

High fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels before fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) administration for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) might affect the accuracy of 18-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. Current guidelines require FPG levels of < 200 mg/dL before FDG administration; however, the literature on the effect of FPG levels of < 200 mg/dL on the accuracy of FDG-PET/CT is scarce.

Results

Thirty-four patients were hyperglycemic and 127 non diabetic. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of FDG-PET/CT were 90%, 88%, 87% and 91% in non diabetic and 82%, 92%, 95% and 73% in hyperglycemic patients, respectively. Overall, the accuracy was higher in non diabetic than hyperglycemic patients (89% vs. 85%).

Conclusions

Accuracy of FDG-PET/CT for primary diagnosis of pancreatic lesions is higher in patients with FPG levels < 126 mg/dL than in patients with FPG levels between 126 and 200 mg/dL.

Patients and Methods

In this retrospective study, 161 patients who had FDG-PET/CT for initial diagnosis of pancreatic lesions were included. Fasting plasma glucose levels before FDG administration were recorded. Accuracy of FDG-PET/CT in diagnosis of pancreatic lesions was compared between patients who were non diabetic (FPG < 126 mg/dL) and hyperglycemic (126 ≤ FPG < 200 mg/dL).

Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of FPG levels of < 200 mg/dL on the accuracy of FDG-PET/CT in diagnosis of pancreatic lesions.

Background

High fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels before fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) administration for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) might affect the accuracy of 18-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. Current guidelines require FPG levels of < 200 mg/dL before FDG administration; however, the literature on the effect of FPG levels of < 200 mg/dL on the accuracy of FDG-PET/CT is scarce.

Cancer;Diagnosis;Glucose;Pancreas;Positron Emission Tomography Cancer;Diagnosis;Glucose;Pancreas;Positron Emission Tomography http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=16429 Alireza Hamidian Jahromi Alireza Hamidian Jahromi Department of Surgery, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA Department of Surgery, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA Mohammad Kazem Fallahzadeh Mohammad Kazem Fallahzadeh John C. McDonald Regional Transplant Center, Willis Knighton Health System, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA John C. McDonald Regional Transplant Center, Willis Knighton Health System, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA Amol Takalkar Amol Takalkar Department of Nuclear Medicine, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA Department of Nuclear Medicine, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA Jean Sheng Jean Sheng Department of Surgery, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA Department of Surgery, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA Gazi Zibari Gazi Zibari John C. McDonald Regional Transplant Center, Willis Knighton Health System, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA John C. McDonald Regional Transplant Center, Willis Knighton Health System, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA Hosein Shokouh Amiri Hosein Shokouh Amiri John C. McDonald Regional Transplant Center, Willis Knighton Health System, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA; McDonald Regional Transplant Center, Willis Knighton Health System, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA. Tel: +1-3182128932, Fax: +1-3182128356 John C. McDonald Regional Transplant Center, Willis Knighton Health System, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA; McDonald Regional Transplant Center, Willis Knighton Health System, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA. Tel: +1-3182128932, Fax: +1-3182128356
en 10.5812/ijem.18642 Association of Mean Platelet Volume With Androgens and Insulin Resistance in Nonobese Patients With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Association of Mean Platelet Volume With Androgens and Insulin Resistance in Nonobese Patients With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome research-article research-article Background

Mean platelet volume (MPV) is generally accepted as a new marker of cardiovascular disease risk in several studies.

Objectives

This study aimed to determine the association of MPV with androgen hormones and insulin resistance (IR) in nonobese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Patients and Methods

A total of 136 patients with newly diagnosed reproductive-age PCOS (regarding the criteria of new PCOS phenotypes, based on the Rotterdam criteria) who were nonobese with the mean age of 25 years (25.39 ± 5.51) and mean body mass index (BMI) of 21 kg/m2 (22.07 ± 2.13) were included. In addition, 59 healthy subjects with mean age of 26 years (22.07 ± 2.13) and mean BMI of 22 kg/m2 (21.52 ± 3.84) were recruited as control. Total blood count (including MPV), total testosterone, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEAS), and androstenedione levels were recorded. IR was calculated from blood chemistry measurements of fasting insulin and glucose according to updated homeostasis model assessment.

Conclusions

Our study revealed that nonobese women with and without PCOS have similar MPV values. While IR does not have any effect on MPV, elevated androgen levels are associated with a low MPV in nonobese patients with PCOS.

Results

No differences were observed in mean MPV values between patients and control group (9.02 fL (8.5-10.1) and 8.9 fL (7.7-9.1), respectively; P = 0.777). MPV values were similar among nonobese patients with and without IR and control subjects (P > 0.05). We detected significantly lower values of MPV in patients with hyperandrogenemia in comparison to patients with normal androgen levels (8.7 and 9.5 fL, P = 0.012). There was a negative correlation between total testosterone, DHEAS, and MPV (P = 0.016, r = -0.229; and P = 0.006, r = -0.261, respectively). Multiple logistic regression analyses confirmed the independence of these associations.

Background

Mean platelet volume (MPV) is generally accepted as a new marker of cardiovascular disease risk in several studies.

Objectives

This study aimed to determine the association of MPV with androgen hormones and insulin resistance (IR) in nonobese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Patients and Methods

A total of 136 patients with newly diagnosed reproductive-age PCOS (regarding the criteria of new PCOS phenotypes, based on the Rotterdam criteria) who were nonobese with the mean age of 25 years (25.39 ± 5.51) and mean body mass index (BMI) of 21 kg/m2 (22.07 ± 2.13) were included. In addition, 59 healthy subjects with mean age of 26 years (22.07 ± 2.13) and mean BMI of 22 kg/m2 (21.52 ± 3.84) were recruited as control. Total blood count (including MPV), total testosterone, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEAS), and androstenedione levels were recorded. IR was calculated from blood chemistry measurements of fasting insulin and glucose according to updated homeostasis model assessment.

Conclusions

Our study revealed that nonobese women with and without PCOS have similar MPV values. While IR does not have any effect on MPV, elevated androgen levels are associated with a low MPV in nonobese patients with PCOS.

Results

No differences were observed in mean MPV values between patients and control group (9.02 fL (8.5-10.1) and 8.9 fL (7.7-9.1), respectively; P = 0.777). MPV values were similar among nonobese patients with and without IR and control subjects (P > 0.05). We detected significantly lower values of MPV in patients with hyperandrogenemia in comparison to patients with normal androgen levels (8.7 and 9.5 fL, P = 0.012). There was a negative correlation between total testosterone, DHEAS, and MPV (P = 0.016, r = -0.229; and P = 0.006, r = -0.261, respectively). Multiple logistic regression analyses confirmed the independence of these associations.

Androgen Hormones;Mean Platelet Volume;Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Androgen Hormones;Mean Platelet Volume;Polycystic Ovary Syndrome http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=18642 Bercem Aycicek Dogan Bercem Aycicek Dogan Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey; Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey. Tel: +90-3125084734, Fax: +90-3123114340 Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey; Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey. Tel: +90-3125084734, Fax: +90-3123114340 Ayse Arduc Ayse Arduc National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Diabetes-Endocrine and Obesity Branch, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Diabetes-Endocrine and Obesity Branch, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA Mazhar Muslum Tuna Mazhar Muslum Tuna Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey Ersen Karakılıc Ersen Karakılıc Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey Iffet Dagdelen Iffet Dagdelen Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey Yasemin Tutuncu Yasemin Tutuncu Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey Dilek Berker Dilek Berker Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey Serdar Guler Serdar Guler Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolism Disease, Ankara, Turkey
en 10.5812/ijem.18081 Anti-Hyperglycemic and Insulin Sensitizer Effects of Turmeric and Its Principle Constituent Curcumin Anti-Hyperglycemic and Insulin Sensitizer Effects of Turmeric and Its Principle Constituent Curcumin review-article review-article Context

Turmeric is obtained from the plant Curcuma longa L; its major constituent, curcumin, is a polyphenol with multiple effects which can modulate some signaling pathways.

Evidence Acquisition

Insulin resistance is a major risk factor for chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerotic, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. In addition, Insulin resistance in peripheral tissue is one of the most important reasons of hyperglycemia which can cause global or systemic effects. The present study reviewed studies published in PubMed from 1998 to 2013, indicating the role of curcumin in attenuation of many pathophysiological processes involved in development and progression of hyperglycemia and insulin resistance.

Results

Curcumin can reduce blood glucose level by reducing the hepatic glucose production, suppression of hyperglycemia-induced inflammatory state, stimulation of glucose uptake by up-regulation of GLUT4, GLUT2 and GLUT3 genes expressions, activation of AMP kinase, promoting the PPAR ligand-binding activity, stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic tissues, improvement in pancreatic cell function, and reduction of insulin resistance.

Conclusions

Curcumin has antihyperglycemic and insulin sensitizer effects. Thereby, more studies evaluating the effects of curcumin on hyperglycemic state and insulin resistance in related disorders such as diabetes are recommended.

Context

Turmeric is obtained from the plant Curcuma longa L; its major constituent, curcumin, is a polyphenol with multiple effects which can modulate some signaling pathways.

Evidence Acquisition

Insulin resistance is a major risk factor for chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerotic, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. In addition, Insulin resistance in peripheral tissue is one of the most important reasons of hyperglycemia which can cause global or systemic effects. The present study reviewed studies published in PubMed from 1998 to 2013, indicating the role of curcumin in attenuation of many pathophysiological processes involved in development and progression of hyperglycemia and insulin resistance.

Results

Curcumin can reduce blood glucose level by reducing the hepatic glucose production, suppression of hyperglycemia-induced inflammatory state, stimulation of glucose uptake by up-regulation of GLUT4, GLUT2 and GLUT3 genes expressions, activation of AMP kinase, promoting the PPAR ligand-binding activity, stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic tissues, improvement in pancreatic cell function, and reduction of insulin resistance.

Conclusions

Curcumin has antihyperglycemic and insulin sensitizer effects. Thereby, more studies evaluating the effects of curcumin on hyperglycemic state and insulin resistance in related disorders such as diabetes are recommended.

Turmeric;Curcumin;Curcuminoids;Curcuma longa;Hyperglycemia;Blood Glucose;Insulin Resistance;Hyperinsulinemia Turmeric;Curcumin;Curcuminoids;Curcuma longa;Hyperglycemia;Blood Glucose;Insulin Resistance;Hyperinsulinemia http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=18081 Zeinab Ghorbani Zeinab Ghorbani Faculty of Nutrition and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, IR Iran Faculty of Nutrition and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, IR Iran Azita Hekmatdoost Azita Hekmatdoost Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Parvin Mirmiran Parvin Mirmiran Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box: 19395-4763, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-22357484, Fax: +98-2122416264, +98-2122402463 Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box: 19395-4763, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-22357484, Fax: +98-2122416264, +98-2122402463
en 10.5812/ijem.18980 Association of Marital Status and Marital Transition With Metabolic Syndrome: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study Association of Marital Status and Marital Transition With Metabolic Syndrome: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study research-article research-article Conclusions

Marital status may affect MetS risk z score differently in both genders.

Results

In comparison to participants who were married, no significant changes in MetS risk z score was found in single participants. Employed females in the transition to married group had significant increase in MetS risk z score than single employed females. No significant changes in MetS risk z score were observed between widowed/divorced subjects and compared to consistently married subjects.

Background

Most existing reports indicate that body weight gradually increases following marital status and thereby enhances health status and decreases mortality; however, the association between marital status and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) has not been thoroughly investigated in a longitudinal study.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of marital status and marital transition on MetS during a 9.6-year follow-up in Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.

Patients and Methods

For this study, 5221 participants (2060 males and 3161 females), aged 15 to 90 years at baseline, were followed for a median of 9.6 years. Marital status was categorized as consistent marital status and marital transition. We measured MetS risk z score and its components and calculated their changes. Then the effects of marital status and marital transition on MetS risk z score and its components were assessed using multivariable linear regression.

Conclusions

Marital status may affect MetS risk z score differently in both genders.

Results

In comparison to participants who were married, no significant changes in MetS risk z score was found in single participants. Employed females in the transition to married group had significant increase in MetS risk z score than single employed females. No significant changes in MetS risk z score were observed between widowed/divorced subjects and compared to consistently married subjects.

Background

Most existing reports indicate that body weight gradually increases following marital status and thereby enhances health status and decreases mortality; however, the association between marital status and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) has not been thoroughly investigated in a longitudinal study.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of marital status and marital transition on MetS during a 9.6-year follow-up in Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.

Patients and Methods

For this study, 5221 participants (2060 males and 3161 females), aged 15 to 90 years at baseline, were followed for a median of 9.6 years. Marital status was categorized as consistent marital status and marital transition. We measured MetS risk z score and its components and calculated their changes. Then the effects of marital status and marital transition on MetS risk z score and its components were assessed using multivariable linear regression.

Marital Status;Metabolic Syndrome X;Marital Transition Marital Status;Metabolic Syndrome X;Marital Transition http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=18980 Somayeh Hosseinpour-Niazi Somayeh Hosseinpour-Niazi Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Parvin Mirmiran Parvin Mirmiran Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Farhad Hosseinpanah Farhad Hosseinpanah Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Arefeh Fallah-ghohroudy Arefeh Fallah-ghohroudy Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Fereidoun Azizi Fereidoun Azizi Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, P. O. Box: 193954763, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2122357484, Fax: +98-2122416264; +98-2122402463 Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, P. O. Box: 193954763, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2122357484, Fax: +98-2122416264; +98-2122402463
en 10.5812/ijem.19378 Thyroid Function in Pregnancy and Its Influences on Maternal and Fetal Outcomes Thyroid Function in Pregnancy and Its Influences on Maternal and Fetal Outcomes research-article research-article Conclusions

We revealed that thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy was associated with IUGR and low Apgar score even in subclinical forms. Further studies are required to determine whether early diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases, even in subclinical form, can prevent their adverse effect on fetus.

Background

Maternal thyroid function alters during pregnancy. Inadequate adaptation to these changes results in thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy complications.

Objectives

This prospective study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of thyroid diseases in pregnancy and its outcomes in south of Iran.

Materials and Methods

This prospective study was conducted on 600 healthy singleton pregnant women who aged 18 to 35 years old at 15 to 28 weeks of gestation. We investigated the prevalence of thyroid dysfunctions in women. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the effect thyroid dysfunction on obstetric and neonatal outcome.

Results

Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels of 0.51, 1.18, 1.68, 2.4, and 4.9 mIU/L were at 2.5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 97.5th percentile in our population. The prevalence of clinical hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism, overt hyperthyroidism, and subclinical hyperthyroidism in all pregnant women was 2.4%, 11.3%, 1.2%, and 0.3%, respectively. In addition, 1.4% of patients had isolated hypothyroxinemia. Clinical hypothyroidism was associated with increased risk of preterm delivery (P = 0.045). Subclinical hypothyroidism had a significant association with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) (P = 0.028) as well as low Apgar score at first minute (P = 0.022). Maternal hyperthyroidism was associated with IUGR (P = 0.048).

Conclusions

We revealed that thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy was associated with IUGR and low Apgar score even in subclinical forms. Further studies are required to determine whether early diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases, even in subclinical form, can prevent their adverse effect on fetus.

Background

Maternal thyroid function alters during pregnancy. Inadequate adaptation to these changes results in thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy complications.

Objectives

This prospective study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of thyroid diseases in pregnancy and its outcomes in south of Iran.

Materials and Methods

This prospective study was conducted on 600 healthy singleton pregnant women who aged 18 to 35 years old at 15 to 28 weeks of gestation. We investigated the prevalence of thyroid dysfunctions in women. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the effect thyroid dysfunction on obstetric and neonatal outcome.

Results

Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels of 0.51, 1.18, 1.68, 2.4, and 4.9 mIU/L were at 2.5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 97.5th percentile in our population. The prevalence of clinical hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism, overt hyperthyroidism, and subclinical hyperthyroidism in all pregnant women was 2.4%, 11.3%, 1.2%, and 0.3%, respectively. In addition, 1.4% of patients had isolated hypothyroxinemia. Clinical hypothyroidism was associated with increased risk of preterm delivery (P = 0.045). Subclinical hypothyroidism had a significant association with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) (P = 0.028) as well as low Apgar score at first minute (P = 0.022). Maternal hyperthyroidism was associated with IUGR (P = 0.048).

UGR;Fetal Growth Retardation;Thyroid Dysfunction;Thyroid Disease UGR;Fetal Growth Retardation;Thyroid Dysfunction;Thyroid Disease http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=19378 Forough Saki Forough Saki Shiraz Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Shiraz Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Mohammad Hossein Dabbaghmanesh Mohammad Hossein Dabbaghmanesh Shiraz Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Shiraz Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran, Tel: +98-7116473096, Fax: +98-7116473096, E-mail:; Mohammad Hossein Dabbaghmanesh, Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-7116473096, Fax: +98-7116473096, Shiraz Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Shiraz Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran, Tel: +98-7116473096, Fax: +98-7116473096, E-mail:; Mohammad Hossein Dabbaghmanesh, Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-7116473096, Fax: +98-7116473096, Seyede Zahra Ghaemi Seyede Zahra Ghaemi Department of Midwifery, Islamic Azad University, Estahban Branch, Estahban, IR Iran Department of Midwifery, Islamic Azad University, Estahban Branch, Estahban, IR Iran Sedighe Forouhari Sedighe Forouhari Shiraz Infertility Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Shiraz Infertility Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Gholamhossein Ranjbar Omrani Gholamhossein Ranjbar Omrani Shiraz Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Shiraz Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Marzieh Bakhshayeshkaram Marzieh Bakhshayeshkaram Shiraz Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Shiraz Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran, Tel: +98-7116473096, Fax: +98-7116473096, E-mail:; Mohammad Hossein Dabbaghmanesh, Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-7116473096, Fax: +98-7116473096, Shiraz Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Shiraz Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran, Tel: +98-7116473096, Fax: +98-7116473096, E-mail:; Mohammad Hossein Dabbaghmanesh, Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-7116473096, Fax: +98-7116473096,