International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism Int J Endocrinol Metab http://www.endometabol.com 1726-913X 1726-9148 10.5812/ijem en jalali 2017 6 22 gregorian 2017 6 22 13 1
en 10.5812/ijem.17988 The Effect of Ghrelin and Estradiol on Mean Concentration of Thyroid Hormones The Effect of Ghrelin and Estradiol on Mean Concentration of Thyroid Hormones research-article research-article Results

The results indicated that ghrelin significantly decreased thyroid hormone concentrations, whereas estradiol increased these concentrations. The simultaneous injection of ghrelin and estradiol significantly decreased the inhibitory effect of ghrelin on thyroid hormone concentrations (P < 0.05).

Conclusions

According to the results of this study, both ghrelin and estradiol affect the concentration of thyroid hormone but in opposite directions. This difference might be due to different underlying hormonal mechanisms such as HPA and/or HPT axis melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) systems could be suggested.

Objectives

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of interactions between ghrelin and estradiol (injected via ICV route) on plasma T3 and T4 concentrations in female rats.

Background

Ghrelin is a novel peptide hormone that has GH releasing activity and also other endocrine and metabolic functions. It can also increase food intake and decrease T3 and T4 concentrations. Several parameters of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis function are modulated by 17β-estradiol (E2).

Materials and Methods

Eighteen Wistar female rats (bodyweight, 200-250 g) were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 received estradiol, Group 2 received ghrelin and Group 3 received ghrelin and estradiol. Plasma samples were used to assess T3 and T4 concentration by RIA.

Results

The results indicated that ghrelin significantly decreased thyroid hormone concentrations, whereas estradiol increased these concentrations. The simultaneous injection of ghrelin and estradiol significantly decreased the inhibitory effect of ghrelin on thyroid hormone concentrations (P < 0.05).

Conclusions

According to the results of this study, both ghrelin and estradiol affect the concentration of thyroid hormone but in opposite directions. This difference might be due to different underlying hormonal mechanisms such as HPA and/or HPT axis melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) systems could be suggested.

Objectives

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of interactions between ghrelin and estradiol (injected via ICV route) on plasma T3 and T4 concentrations in female rats.

Background

Ghrelin is a novel peptide hormone that has GH releasing activity and also other endocrine and metabolic functions. It can also increase food intake and decrease T3 and T4 concentrations. Several parameters of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis function are modulated by 17β-estradiol (E2).

Materials and Methods

Eighteen Wistar female rats (bodyweight, 200-250 g) were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 received estradiol, Group 2 received ghrelin and Group 3 received ghrelin and estradiol. Plasma samples were used to assess T3 and T4 concentration by RIA.

Ghrelin;Estradiol;Injection Ghrelin;Estradiol;Injection http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=17988 Fatemeh Kordi Fatemeh Kordi Department of Physiology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Physiology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, IR Iran Homayoun Khazali Homayoun Khazali Department of Physiology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, IR Iran; Department of Physiology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9121254041 Department of Physiology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, IR Iran; Department of Physiology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9121254041
en 10.5812/ijem.18791 Effect of Mobile Phone Short Text Messages on Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Effect of Mobile Phone Short Text Messages on Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes in-brief in-brief Conclusions

Mobile phone text messaging increased adherence to diabetes therapy and improved the clinical outcome in Saudi patients with type 2 diabetes.

Results

In addition to significant improvement in patients’ knowledge, mean fasting blood glucose level improved from 8.60 ± 3.16 to 7.77 ± 3.11 mmol/L and mean HbA1c decreased from 9.9% ± 1.8% to 9.5% ± 1.7%.

Objectives

We conducted a study to evaluate the effect of mobile phone short message service (SMS) on glycemic control in Saudi patients with type 2 diabetes.

Patients and Methods

One hundred patients (mean age, 41 ± 9.5 years) were selected at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and provided with daily educational, reminding SMS messages for four months. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, frequency of hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic attacks, and compliance with blood glucose monitoring were recorded before and after the trial.

Background

Mobile phone text messaging has rapidly become a socially popular form of communication. Several studies showed that mobile phone might offer a useful means of providing information between clinic visits and might increase adherence to diabetes therapy regimens.

Conclusions

Mobile phone text messaging increased adherence to diabetes therapy and improved the clinical outcome in Saudi patients with type 2 diabetes.

Results

In addition to significant improvement in patients’ knowledge, mean fasting blood glucose level improved from 8.60 ± 3.16 to 7.77 ± 3.11 mmol/L and mean HbA1c decreased from 9.9% ± 1.8% to 9.5% ± 1.7%.

Objectives

We conducted a study to evaluate the effect of mobile phone short message service (SMS) on glycemic control in Saudi patients with type 2 diabetes.

Patients and Methods

One hundred patients (mean age, 41 ± 9.5 years) were selected at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and provided with daily educational, reminding SMS messages for four months. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, frequency of hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic attacks, and compliance with blood glucose monitoring were recorded before and after the trial.

Background

Mobile phone text messaging has rapidly become a socially popular form of communication. Several studies showed that mobile phone might offer a useful means of providing information between clinic visits and might increase adherence to diabetes therapy regimens.

Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2;Cellular Phone;Health;Glycemic;Text Messages Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2;Cellular Phone;Health;Glycemic;Text Messages http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=18791 Bassam Bin Abbas Bassam Bin Abbas Department of Pediatrics, Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Department of Pediatrics, Security Forces Hospital, P. O. Box: 3354, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Tel: +966-534341777, Fax: +966-114427784 Department of Pediatrics, Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Department of Pediatrics, Security Forces Hospital, P. O. Box: 3354, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Tel: +966-534341777, Fax: +966-114427784 Abdullah Al Fares Abdullah Al Fares Department of Pediatrics, Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Department of Pediatrics, Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Musleh Jabbari Musleh Jabbari Imam University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Imam University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abdelmoneim El Dali Abdelmoneim El Dali Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Scientific Computing, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Scientific Computing, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Fahad Al Orifi Fahad Al Orifi Department of Telemedicine and E-Health, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Department of Telemedicine and E-Health, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
en 10.5812/ijem.20620 The Effects of Vitamin D on Insulin Release From Isolated Islets of Rats The Effects of Vitamin D on Insulin Release From Isolated Islets of Rats research-article research-article Results

Coincubation of islets with vitamin D (10 nM) and 11.1 mM glucose increased islet insulin release (37.27 ± 3.75 vs. 24.64 ± 2.83 ng/islet/24 hours; P < 0.05), while vitamin D (1 and 10 nM) decreased insulin release in the presence of 16.7 mM glucose (21.14 ± 3.58 and 18.65 ± 3.84 vs. 37.71 ± 4.63 ng/ islet/24 hours; P < 0.05). Islets preincubation with vitamin D (1 and 10 nM) increased GSIS in the presence of 16.7 mM glucose (4.39 ± 0.73 and 4.39 ± 0.63 vs. 2.07 ± 0.43 ng/islet/1 hour; P < 0.05).

Background

Vitamin D (vit D) affects glucose metabolism. Receptors of vitamin D have been identified in β cells and studies show that vitamin D deficiency reduces glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS).

Objectives

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of vitamin D on insulin release from isolated islets of rats.

Materials and Methods

Islets were isolated from male Wistar rats, weighing 200-250 grams, using the collagenase digestion method. Insulin release was assessed following 24 and 48 hours coincubation of islets with vitamin D (0.1, 1 and 10 nM) and glucose (5.6, 11.1 and 16.7 mM). In addition, islets were preincubated with vitamin D for 24 and 48 hours and GSIS was assessed for one hour in the presence of 5.6 and 16.7 mM glucose.

Conclusions

Preincubation of islets with vitamin D increased GSIS but decreased insulin release in coincubation with high levels of glucose. Insulin secretion from β cells in the presence of glucose seems to be related to the dosage of vitamin D and duration of preincubation.

Results

Coincubation of islets with vitamin D (10 nM) and 11.1 mM glucose increased islet insulin release (37.27 ± 3.75 vs. 24.64 ± 2.83 ng/islet/24 hours; P < 0.05), while vitamin D (1 and 10 nM) decreased insulin release in the presence of 16.7 mM glucose (21.14 ± 3.58 and 18.65 ± 3.84 vs. 37.71 ± 4.63 ng/ islet/24 hours; P < 0.05). Islets preincubation with vitamin D (1 and 10 nM) increased GSIS in the presence of 16.7 mM glucose (4.39 ± 0.73 and 4.39 ± 0.63 vs. 2.07 ± 0.43 ng/islet/1 hour; P < 0.05).

Background

Vitamin D (vit D) affects glucose metabolism. Receptors of vitamin D have been identified in β cells and studies show that vitamin D deficiency reduces glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS).

Objectives

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of vitamin D on insulin release from isolated islets of rats.

Materials and Methods

Islets were isolated from male Wistar rats, weighing 200-250 grams, using the collagenase digestion method. Insulin release was assessed following 24 and 48 hours coincubation of islets with vitamin D (0.1, 1 and 10 nM) and glucose (5.6, 11.1 and 16.7 mM). In addition, islets were preincubated with vitamin D for 24 and 48 hours and GSIS was assessed for one hour in the presence of 5.6 and 16.7 mM glucose.

Conclusions

Preincubation of islets with vitamin D increased GSIS but decreased insulin release in coincubation with high levels of glucose. Insulin secretion from β cells in the presence of glucose seems to be related to the dosage of vitamin D and duration of preincubation.

Pancreatic Islets;Rat;Vitamin D;Insulin Pancreatic Islets;Rat;Vitamin D;Insulin http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=20620 Sajad Jeddi Sajad Jeddi Endocrine Physiology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Endocrine Physiology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Leila Syedmoradi Leila Syedmoradi Endocrine Physiology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Endocrine Physiology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Fatemeh Bagheripour Fatemeh Bagheripour Endocrine Physiology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Endocrine Physiology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Asghar Ghasemi Asghar Ghasemi Endocrine Physiology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Physiology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box: 193954763, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2122432500, Fax: +98-2122416264 Endocrine Physiology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Physiology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box: 193954763, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2122432500, Fax: +98-2122416264
en 10.5812/ijem.19511 Antimullerian Hormone and Its Receptor Gene Expression in Prenatally Androgenized Female Rats Antimullerian Hormone and Its Receptor Gene Expression in Prenatally Androgenized Female Rats research-article research-article Conclusions

While AMH receptor expression was higher in experimental rats, their serum concentrations of AMH were decreased. Further researches with greater sample sizes and measurement of bioactive forms of hormones are recommended to confirm the findings of this study.

Background

Anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) levels reflect the number of small antral follicles in ovaries and expression changes of AMH and its receptor are suspected to be involved in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate gene expression of AMH and its receptor in immature and adult rats prenatally exposed to androgen excess.

Materials and Methods

Six pregnant Wistar rats in the experimental group were treated by subcutaneous injection of 5 mg free testosterone on day 20 of pregnancy, while controls (n = 6) received only 500 mL of solvent. Female pups of each mother were randomly divided into three groups as day 0 (newborn), 10-day old and days 75-85 (adult). RNAs were extracted from ovarian tissues and relative expression levels for AMH and its receptor genes were measured using TaqMan Real-Time PCR. Serum AMH and testosterone levels were measured using ELISA method.

Results

Relative AMH expression decreased in newborns, 10-day olds and adults (0.806, 0.443 and 0.809 fold, respectively). AMHR expression was higher in newborns and adults (1.432 and 1.057 fold, respectively), while it decreased by 0.263 fold in 10-day olds, although none of them were significant (P > 0.05). In addition, AMH levels were consistent with the results of gene expression. Testosterone hormone levels from 10 day-olds to adults were significantly increased in both study groups (P = 0.016).

Conclusions

While AMH receptor expression was higher in experimental rats, their serum concentrations of AMH were decreased. Further researches with greater sample sizes and measurement of bioactive forms of hormones are recommended to confirm the findings of this study.

Background

Anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) levels reflect the number of small antral follicles in ovaries and expression changes of AMH and its receptor are suspected to be involved in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate gene expression of AMH and its receptor in immature and adult rats prenatally exposed to androgen excess.

Materials and Methods

Six pregnant Wistar rats in the experimental group were treated by subcutaneous injection of 5 mg free testosterone on day 20 of pregnancy, while controls (n = 6) received only 500 mL of solvent. Female pups of each mother were randomly divided into three groups as day 0 (newborn), 10-day old and days 75-85 (adult). RNAs were extracted from ovarian tissues and relative expression levels for AMH and its receptor genes were measured using TaqMan Real-Time PCR. Serum AMH and testosterone levels were measured using ELISA method.

Results

Relative AMH expression decreased in newborns, 10-day olds and adults (0.806, 0.443 and 0.809 fold, respectively). AMHR expression was higher in newborns and adults (1.432 and 1.057 fold, respectively), while it decreased by 0.263 fold in 10-day olds, although none of them were significant (P > 0.05). In addition, AMH levels were consistent with the results of gene expression. Testosterone hormone levels from 10 day-olds to adults were significantly increased in both study groups (P = 0.016).

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome;Anti-Mullerian Hormone;Anti-Mullerian Hormone Receptor;Gene Expression;Rat Polycystic Ovary Syndrome;Anti-Mullerian Hormone;Anti-Mullerian Hormone Receptor;Gene Expression;Rat http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=19511 Zahra Daneshian Zahra Daneshian Department of Basic Sciences, Tehran Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Basic Sciences, Tehran Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, IR Iran Fahimeh Ramezani Tehrani Fahimeh Ramezani Tehrani Reproductive Endocrinology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Reproductive Endocrinology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Maryam Zarkesh Maryam Zarkesh Cellular and Molecular Endocrine Research Center, Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Cellular and Molecular Endocrine Research Center, Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mahsa Norooz Zadeh Mahsa Norooz Zadeh Reproductive Endocrinology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Reproductive Endocrinology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Reza Mahdian Reza Mahdian Biotechnology Research Centre, Department of Molecular Medicine, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, IR Iran Biotechnology Research Centre, Department of Molecular Medicine, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, IR Iran Azita Zadeh Vakili Azita Zadeh Vakili Cellular and Molecular Endocrine Research Center, Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Cellular and Molecular Endocrine Research Center, Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2122432500, Fax: +98-2122416264 Cellular and Molecular Endocrine Research Center, Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Cellular and Molecular Endocrine Research Center, Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2122432500, Fax: +98-2122416264
en 10.5812/ijem.17570 Anti-Thyroid Drugs-Related Myopathy: Is Carbimazole the Real Culprit? Anti-Thyroid Drugs-Related Myopathy: Is Carbimazole the Real Culprit? case-report case-report Case Presentation

A 28-year old Chinese female was treated with carbimazole (CMZ) for Graves’ disease with hyperthyroidism. Two weeks later, she developed myalgia and proximal muscle weakness. Investigations showed evidence of myopathy. CMZ was stopped and rapid improvement of clinical condition and biochemical parameters ensued.

Conclusions

Rapid decrement of thyroid hormone level is recognized as an important association for anti-thyroid drugs (ATDs)-related myopathy; however, the drug effects on muscle tissue cannot be excluded. Further elucidation of pathophysiology and identification of risk factors are needed. After commencing ATDs, early recognition of this rare condition and close monitoring are the essence of management. Different treatment strategies: dose reduction of ATDs, switching to alternative ATDs, with or without addition of thyroid hormone supplement can be applied depending on clinical situation.

Introduction

Anti-thyroid drugs (ATDs)-related myopathy is rarely reported in literature, but once developed, it can cause significant morbidity to patient.

Case Presentation

A 28-year old Chinese female was treated with carbimazole (CMZ) for Graves’ disease with hyperthyroidism. Two weeks later, she developed myalgia and proximal muscle weakness. Investigations showed evidence of myopathy. CMZ was stopped and rapid improvement of clinical condition and biochemical parameters ensued.

Conclusions

Rapid decrement of thyroid hormone level is recognized as an important association for anti-thyroid drugs (ATDs)-related myopathy; however, the drug effects on muscle tissue cannot be excluded. Further elucidation of pathophysiology and identification of risk factors are needed. After commencing ATDs, early recognition of this rare condition and close monitoring are the essence of management. Different treatment strategies: dose reduction of ATDs, switching to alternative ATDs, with or without addition of thyroid hormone supplement can be applied depending on clinical situation.

Introduction

Anti-thyroid drugs (ATDs)-related myopathy is rarely reported in literature, but once developed, it can cause significant morbidity to patient.

Muscular Disease;Myositis;Carbimazole;Graves ‘disease;Hyperthyroidism;Creatine Kinase Muscular Disease;Myositis;Carbimazole;Graves ‘disease;Hyperthyroidism;Creatine Kinase http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=17570 Chiu Chi Tsang Chiu Chi Tsang Department of Medicine, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, Hong Kong, China; Department of Medicine, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, Hong Kong, China. Tel: +852-26892000, Fax: +852-26892472 Department of Medicine, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, Hong Kong, China; Department of Medicine, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, Hong Kong, China. Tel: +852-26892000, Fax: +852-26892472 Wai Shan Hui Wai Shan Hui Department of Medicine, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, Hong Kong, China Department of Medicine, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, Hong Kong, China Kwun Man Lo Kwun Man Lo Department of Medicine, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, Hong Kong, China Department of Medicine, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, Hong Kong, China Jonas Hon Ming Yeung Jonas Hon Ming Yeung Department of Medicine, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, Hong Kong, China Department of Medicine, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, Hong Kong, China Yuk Lun Cheng Yuk Lun Cheng Department of Medicine, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, Hong Kong, China Department of Medicine, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, Hong Kong, China
en 10.5812/ijem.18220 A Case Report of Thyroid Carcinoma Confined to Ovary and Concurrently Occult in the Thyroid: Is Conservative Treatment Always Advised? A Case Report of Thyroid Carcinoma Confined to Ovary and Concurrently Occult in the Thyroid: Is Conservative Treatment Always Advised? case-report case-report Introduction

Struma ovarii is an ovarian teratoma, represented in more than 50% by thyroid tissue. Five percent of struma ovarii cases have been proven to be malignant and, as in the thyroid gland, papillary thyroid carcinoma is the most common histotype arising in struma ovarii. Because of the unusual occurrence of this tumor, its management and follow-up after pelvic surgery is still controversial. Usually, total thyroidectomy followed by radioiodine treatment is the choice treatment in metastatic malignant struma ovarii, while these procedures are still controversial in non-metastatic thyroid cancer arising in struma ovarii.

Case Presentation

We report a female with follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma arising in struma ovarii. After pelvic surgery, thyroid morphofunctional examinations were performed and a single nodular lesion in the left lobe was discovered. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy and histological examination showed a papillary carcinoma. Radioiodine-ablation of residual thyroid tissue was performed and levothyroxine mildly-suppressive treatment was started.

Conclusions

A more aggressive treatment should not be denied for malignant struma ovarii without any evidence, even when apparently confined into the ovary. However, in selected cases, aggressive treatment may be advisable to decrease the risk of recurrence and to allow an accurate follow-up.

Introduction

Struma ovarii is an ovarian teratoma, represented in more than 50% by thyroid tissue. Five percent of struma ovarii cases have been proven to be malignant and, as in the thyroid gland, papillary thyroid carcinoma is the most common histotype arising in struma ovarii. Because of the unusual occurrence of this tumor, its management and follow-up after pelvic surgery is still controversial. Usually, total thyroidectomy followed by radioiodine treatment is the choice treatment in metastatic malignant struma ovarii, while these procedures are still controversial in non-metastatic thyroid cancer arising in struma ovarii.

Case Presentation

We report a female with follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma arising in struma ovarii. After pelvic surgery, thyroid morphofunctional examinations were performed and a single nodular lesion in the left lobe was discovered. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy and histological examination showed a papillary carcinoma. Radioiodine-ablation of residual thyroid tissue was performed and levothyroxine mildly-suppressive treatment was started.

Conclusions

A more aggressive treatment should not be denied for malignant struma ovarii without any evidence, even when apparently confined into the ovary. However, in selected cases, aggressive treatment may be advisable to decrease the risk of recurrence and to allow an accurate follow-up.

Thyroid Carcinoma;Thyroidectomy;Struma Ovarii Thyroid Carcinoma;Thyroidectomy;Struma Ovarii http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=18220 Nunzia Brusca Nunzia Brusca Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Latina, Italy Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Latina, Italy Susanna Carlotta Del Duca Susanna Carlotta Del Duca Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Latina, Italy Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Latina, Italy Rita Salvatori Rita Salvatori Department of Nuclear Medicine, Santa Maria Goretti Hospital, AUSL Latina, Latina, Italy Department of Nuclear Medicine, Santa Maria Goretti Hospital, AUSL Latina, Latina, Italy Antonio D’Agostini Antonio D’Agostini Department of Nuclear Medicine, Santa Maria Goretti Hospital, AUSL Latina, Latina, Italy Department of Nuclear Medicine, Santa Maria Goretti Hospital, AUSL Latina, Latina, Italy Pina Cannas Pina Cannas Department of Nuclear Medicine, Santa Maria Goretti Hospital, AUSL Latina, Latina, Italy Department of Nuclear Medicine, Santa Maria Goretti Hospital, AUSL Latina, Latina, Italy Maria Giulia Santaguida Maria Giulia Santaguida Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Latina, Italy Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Latina, Italy Camilla Virili Camilla Virili Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Latina, Italy Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Latina, Italy Loredana Bianchi Loredana Bianchi Endocrinology Unit, Santa Maria Goretti Hospital, AUSL Latina, Latina, Italy Endocrinology Unit, Santa Maria Goretti Hospital, AUSL Latina, Latina, Italy Lucilla Gargano Lucilla Gargano Endocrinology Unit, Santa Maria Goretti Hospital, AUSL Latina, Latina, Italy Endocrinology Unit, Santa Maria Goretti Hospital, AUSL Latina, Latina, Italy Marco Centanni Marco Centanni Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Latina, Italy; Endocrinology Unit, Santa Maria Goretti Hospital, AUSL Latina, Latina, Italy; Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Latina, Italy. Tel/Fax: +39-0649972604 Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Latina, Italy; Endocrinology Unit, Santa Maria Goretti Hospital, AUSL Latina, Latina, Italy; Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Latina, Italy. Tel/Fax: +39-0649972604
en 10.5812/ijem.21160 Effect of Camel Milk on Blood Sugar and Lipid Profile of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Clinical Trial Effect of Camel Milk on Blood Sugar and Lipid Profile of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Clinical Trial research-article research-article Conclusions

Camel milk increased insulin level in patients with T2DM and might contribute to glycemic control in T2DM.

Results

Mean of insulin concentration was significantly increased from 64.59 to 84.03 pmol/L in the camel milk group during the study (P < 0.05). No significant differences were shown in fasting blood sugar, lipid profile, and blood pressure between the two groups at the end of study. There was significant increase in homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) during the study in both groups, but no significant difference was seen between the two groups.

Background

It has been shown that camel milk consumption has a definite decreasing effect on the prevalence of diabetes. However, most of these studies were conducted on patients with type 1 diabetes, whereas studies on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are limited. In vitro experiments have shown that camel milk was able to decrease blood glucose concentration.

Objectives

The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of camel and cow milk on blood sugar, lipid profile, and blood pressure of patients with T2DM.

Patients and Methods

In a randomized single-blinded controlled clinical trial, 20 patients with T2DM were randomly allocated into two groups. Participants consumed 500 mL of either camel milk (intervention group) or cow milk (control group) daily for two months.

Conclusions

Camel milk increased insulin level in patients with T2DM and might contribute to glycemic control in T2DM.

Results

Mean of insulin concentration was significantly increased from 64.59 to 84.03 pmol/L in the camel milk group during the study (P < 0.05). No significant differences were shown in fasting blood sugar, lipid profile, and blood pressure between the two groups at the end of study. There was significant increase in homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) during the study in both groups, but no significant difference was seen between the two groups.

Background

It has been shown that camel milk consumption has a definite decreasing effect on the prevalence of diabetes. However, most of these studies were conducted on patients with type 1 diabetes, whereas studies on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are limited. In vitro experiments have shown that camel milk was able to decrease blood glucose concentration.

Objectives

The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of camel and cow milk on blood sugar, lipid profile, and blood pressure of patients with T2DM.

Patients and Methods

In a randomized single-blinded controlled clinical trial, 20 patients with T2DM were randomly allocated into two groups. Participants consumed 500 mL of either camel milk (intervention group) or cow milk (control group) daily for two months.

Camel;Milk;Insulin;Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Camel;Milk;Insulin;Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=21160 Hanieh Sadat Ejtahed Hanieh Sadat Ejtahed Obesity Research Center, Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Obesity Research Center, Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Amir Niasari Naslaji Amir Niasari Naslaji Department of Theriogenology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Theriogenology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Tehran, IR Iran Parvin Mirmiran Parvin Mirmiran Obesity Research Center, Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetic, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Obesity Research Center, Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetic, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Maryam Zraif Yeganeh Maryam Zraif Yeganeh Obesity Research Center, Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Obesity Research Center, Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mehdi Hedayati Mehdi Hedayati Cellular and Molecular Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Cellular and Molecular Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Fereidoun Azizi Fereidoun Azizi Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2122409309, Fax: +98-2122402463 Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2122409309, Fax: +98-2122402463 Aliakbar Moosavi Movahedi Aliakbar Moosavi Movahedi Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran, IR Iran Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran, IR Iran
en 10.5812/ijem.25728 Early Detection and Optimized Management of Thyroid Disease in Pregnancy Early Detection and Optimized Management of Thyroid Disease in Pregnancy editorial editorial Thyroid Diseases;Pregnancy;Prevention Thyroid Diseases;Pregnancy;Prevention http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=25728 Fereidoun Azizi Fereidoun Azizi Endocrine Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, P. O. Box: 193954763, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2122409309, Fax: +98-2122402463 Endocrine Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Endocrine Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, P. O. Box: 193954763, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2122409309, Fax: +98-2122402463
en 10.5812/ijem.22604 Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Glucose Control and Inflammatory Response in Type II Diabetes: A Double Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Glucose Control and Inflammatory Response in Type II Diabetes: A Double Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial research-article research-article Conclusions

Vitamin D repletion for 12 weeks increased serum vitamin D concentrations and improved β-cell activity in vitamin D-deficient type II diabetes with no significant changes in HbA1c or insulin sensitivity.

Results

Median [IQR] 25(OH)D levels increased significantly in the vitamin D group as 58.1 [48, 67.3] nmol/L (P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in the change of HbA1c between the groups (P = 0.5) with a decrease of -0.1% [-1, 0.5] in the vitamin D group and an increase of 0.15% [0.1, 0.2] in the placebo group. A significant improvement was observed in the homeostasis model of assessment of β-cell activity (HOMA-%B) (P = 0.03) with vitamin D supplementation compared to baseline.

Objectives

We assessed whether vitamin D supplementation could be used in vitamin D deficient-type II diabetes to improve glucose metabolism, components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and specific inflammatory biomarkers.

Patients and Methods

A double blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted in King Khalid University Hospital, Saudi Arabia to evaluate the effect of cholecalciferol supplementation on glycemic control, MetS components and specific inflammatory biomarkers including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin (IL-6), leptin, adiponectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Twenty-two patients with type II diabetes with insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥ 6 (42 mmol/mol) and serum 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/L were randomized using a computer program to receive either supplementation with cholecalciferol (5000 IU/day) or placebo for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c levels from baseline.

Background

Diabetes mellitus (DM) and vitamin D deficiency are major health concerns around the world. Evidence suggests a possible role of vitamin D in improvement of insulin secretion and sensitivity.

Conclusions

Vitamin D repletion for 12 weeks increased serum vitamin D concentrations and improved β-cell activity in vitamin D-deficient type II diabetes with no significant changes in HbA1c or insulin sensitivity.

Results

Median [IQR] 25(OH)D levels increased significantly in the vitamin D group as 58.1 [48, 67.3] nmol/L (P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in the change of HbA1c between the groups (P = 0.5) with a decrease of -0.1% [-1, 0.5] in the vitamin D group and an increase of 0.15% [0.1, 0.2] in the placebo group. A significant improvement was observed in the homeostasis model of assessment of β-cell activity (HOMA-%B) (P = 0.03) with vitamin D supplementation compared to baseline.

Objectives

We assessed whether vitamin D supplementation could be used in vitamin D deficient-type II diabetes to improve glucose metabolism, components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and specific inflammatory biomarkers.

Patients and Methods

A double blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted in King Khalid University Hospital, Saudi Arabia to evaluate the effect of cholecalciferol supplementation on glycemic control, MetS components and specific inflammatory biomarkers including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin (IL-6), leptin, adiponectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Twenty-two patients with type II diabetes with insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥ 6 (42 mmol/mol) and serum 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/L were randomized using a computer program to receive either supplementation with cholecalciferol (5000 IU/day) or placebo for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c levels from baseline.

Background

Diabetes mellitus (DM) and vitamin D deficiency are major health concerns around the world. Evidence suggests a possible role of vitamin D in improvement of insulin secretion and sensitivity.

Diabetes Mellitus;Insulin Resistance;Vitamin D Diabetes Mellitus;Insulin Resistance;Vitamin D http://www.endometabol.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=22604 Mohammed E. Al-Sofiani Mohammed E. Al-Sofiani Internal Medicine, Catholic Health System, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA; College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Internal Medicine, Catholic Health System, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA. Tel: +1-5182539929 Internal Medicine, Catholic Health System, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA; College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Internal Medicine, Catholic Health System, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA. Tel: +1-5182539929 Anwar Jammah Anwar Jammah College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Michael Racz Michael Racz Internal Medicine, Catholic Health System, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA Internal Medicine, Catholic Health System, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA Rajab A. Khawaja Rajab A. Khawaja College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Rana Hasanato Rana Hasanato College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Hassan A. N. El-Fawal Hassan A. N. El-Fawal Internal Medicine, Catholic Health System, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA Internal Medicine, Catholic Health System, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA Shaker A. Mousa Shaker A. Mousa Internal Medicine, Catholic Health System, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA; Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Rensselaer, New York, USA Internal Medicine, Catholic Health System, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA; Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Rensselaer, New York, USA Darius L. Mason Darius L. Mason Internal Medicine, Catholic Health System, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA Internal Medicine, Catholic Health System, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA