The Respiratory Exchange Ratio Is Higher in Older Subjects, but Is Reduced by Aerobic Exercise Training

AUTHORS

Atcharaporn Limprasertkul 4 , Nadine M. Fisher 1 , Nadine M Fisher 2 , Atif B. Awad 1 , Atif B Awad 1 , David R. Pendergast 5 , ** , David R Pendergast 4 , *

4 Centers for Research and Education in Special Environments, University at Buffalo, [email protected], USA

1 Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, University at Buffalo, USA

2 Rehabilitation Science, University at Buffalo, USA

5 1, Departments of Physiology and Biophysics University at Buffalo, Buffalo, USA. 2, Centers for Research and Education in Special Environments, University at Buffalo, [email protected], USA

Corresponding Authors:

How to Cite: Limprasertkul A , Fisher N, Fisher N, Awad A, Awad A , et al. The Respiratory Exchange Ratio Is Higher in Older Subjects, but Is Reduced by Aerobic Exercise Training, Int J Endocrinol Metab. Online ahead of Print ; 9(1):264-270. doi: 10.5812/kowsar.1726913X.1789.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism: 9 (1); 264-270
Published Online: January 1, 2011
Article Type: Original Article
Received: November 5, 2010
Accepted: December 30, 2010
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Abstract

Background: Previous studies have suggested reduced fat metabolism in older subjects. However, corrections for their reduced maximal oxygen consumption and the effects of training and substrate availability have not been fully examined.
Objectives: Fat metabolism (FM) in older subjects (n = 14, 75 ± 7 yrs), and the effects of exercise training were compared with FM in younger subjects (n = 16, 22 ± 3 yrs).
Materials and Methods: All subjects completed a maximal exercise test and a sustained submaximal run at 70% of their maximal capacity. The respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and blood substrate levels were determined. Older subjects were re-tested after training.
Results: Young subjects had higher oxygen consumption (VO2) peak (36.3 ± 6.7 vs. 23.7 ± 6.2 ml/kg/min) and lower slope of RER vs. VO2 than older subjects. However, the slope of the RER vs. VO2 relationship was not different between younger and older subjects, after correction for their VO2 peaks. Younger subjects had longer sustained exercise times (45.5 ± 17.6 min) than the elderly (30.2 ± 14.0 min), pre-training. Post-training, there was a significant increase in VO2 peak (25%) in older subjects (P = 0.001) and submaximal exercise time (30.2 ± 14.0 vs. 58.3 ± 27.3min, P = 0.020). Respiratory exchange ratio was reduced during both exercises after training (0.90 ± 0.03 vs. 1.00 ± 0.03, P = 0.04).
Conclusions: The RER of older subjects was not different from that of younger subjects, after correction for the VO2 peak. The VO2 peak, sustained exercise time, and RER decreased after training in older subjects, indicating increased fat metabolism.


  • Implication for health policy/practice/research/medical education:
    The present study demonstrates the importance of maximal oxygen consumption in determining fat metabolism in the elderly. When this is considered along with the other reported benefits of relatively high maximal oxygen consumption in the elderly emphasizes the importance of regular physical activity to health and wellness.
  • Please cite this paper as:
    Limprasertkul A, Fisher NM, Awad AB, Pendergast DR. The Respiratory Exchange Ratio Is Higher in Older Subjects, but Is Reduced by Aerobic Exercise Training. Int J Endocriol Metab. 2011;9(1):264-70.DOI:10.5812/kowsar.1726913X.1789

© 2011 Kowsar M.P.Co. All rights reserved.


Keywords

Aging Exercise Fat oxidation Exercise training Blood lipids

© 2011, International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.

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