Number of Components of the Metabolic Syndrome; Smoking and Inflammatory Markers

AUTHORS

Tomoyuki Kawada 1 , * , Toshiaki Otsuka 1 , Tokiomi Endo 2 , Yoichi Kon 2

1 Department of Hygiene and Public Health, Nippon Medical School, Bunkyo-Ku, [email protected], Japan

2 Division of Health Evaluation & Promotion, Ota Memorial Hospital, Ota-city, Japan

How to Cite: Kawada T, Otsuka T, Endo T, Kon Y. Number of Components of the Metabolic Syndrome; Smoking and Inflammatory Markers, Int J Endocrinol Metab. Online ahead of Print ; 11(1):23-26. doi: 10.5812/ijem.8403.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism: 11 (1); 23-26
Published Online: December 21, 2012
Article Type: Original Article
Received: October 2, 2012
Accepted: November 24, 2012
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Abstract

Background: The association between inflammatory markers and the combination of the smoking status plus a number of components of the metabolic syndrome was not fully evaluated in male Japanese subjects.

Objectives: To demonstrate the association between inflammatory markers and the number of components of the metabolic syndrome by considering smoking status.

Patients and Methods: A total of 3,017 male subjects (1,047 current smokers, 1,970 non-smokers) were included. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) was defined by the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. The smoking status was categorized in a binary manner into current smokers or non-smokers.

Results: The geometric mean value of the serum CRP increased linearly as the number of components of MetS increased (P < 0.05). In contrast, the mean values of the total WBC, neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts showed peak values when the number of MetS components was 3 or 4. The log-transformed serum CRP levels and the WBC counts were significantly correlated with one another (P < 0.001), but Pearsons correlation coefficient was under 0.3 for current smokers.

Conclusions: Among several inflammatory markers, the serum CRP predominantly changed linearly as the number of MetS increased regardless of smoking status.

Keywords

Metabolic Syndrome Inflammation Smoking

© 2012, International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.

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